How to Wear Mini Skirts and Shorts Trendily

Korean Fashion 2012

Short skirts and shorts are considered basic staple pieces in a girl’s wardrobe. They are usually worn as a casual wear over the weekends, often with t-shirts or tank tops. The thing is, short skirts and shorts are also some of the most versatile clothing that you can mix and match easily your other outfits. You can be really creative and create lots of different looks with them.

There is a misconception that only slim girls can pull off short skirts and shorts. By following some of these guidelines and tips, you too can achieve a trendy look regardless of your size.

1.  Choose the right type of skirt and shorts

• Tight mini skirts and shorts are more suitable for younger teens, or slim and long-legged women.

• To achieve a more mature or classy look, minis that don’t cling will be perfect for you like those skirts with kilts, wraps and pleats.

• High-waist shorts and skirts can make your legs look longer.

• Another option is by wearing leggings with your shorts and skirts. Dark colored leggings such as black, chocolate brown, plums and steel grays are more mature looking, while lighter colors are more suited for teenagers. Leggings will emphasize the legs. Patterned stockings, fishnets, and half- leggings are also another options to show your versatility and creativity.

 

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

 

2. Choose the right shoes.

• To achieve a more girlish look, you can wear wedges or ballet flats to pair with your shorts or skirts. If you are taller, you can also wear flats with ankle straps to emphasize your long legs (not advisable for those who are shorter).

• Heels look best for a night out.

• Pairing boots with skirts is also a great idea for a stylish look. Its best to avoid wearing knee-high black boots with shorts because they are difficult to pull off and can give other people a ‘cheap’ feel. Choosing a pair of boots in a tone that’s similar to your skin color will help to elongate your legs.

• Wedges are great with mini skirts or shorts as it makes you look taller

 

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

 

3.  Choose the right top

• With tight mini skirts, you can wear long or voluminous tops to go with them. It will help to generate a sexy chic vibe.

• You can tuck in your top into your shorts or short skirts to emphasize your waistline. Cinching your waist with a belt will have a better effect.

• When matching plain sleeveless top with a short skirt or shorts, you can layer it with a cardigan and wear a colorful bead necklace to create a more youthful, fun and trendy look.

Additional Tips:

• Don’t just follow the trend. Choose a short skirt or shorts that are not just appropriate for your body type, but also reflects your style and personality at the same time. There are all kinds of styles, from the classic, the trendy, the demure to the sporty, so pick a style that is best suited for you.

• Wear the right underwear under your short skirts or shorts. If they are a little tighter, its best to wear a seamless panty or a G-string to avoid VPL (Visible Panty Line). VPL is an ugly sight and every woman should make an effort to avoid them.

•  We all know that not all women are blessed with long, skinny legs, but that doesn’t need to stop you from wearing shorts and skirts. You just have to identify what are the best ways to wear them. If worn correctly, it will help create a height illusion on a girl, even though she might not be tall.

Here’s more pictures for your inspiration:

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Korean Fashion 2012

Check out K-Styleme for the latest Korean fashion

(Photo Credits to: fashion.163.com)

Korean Fashion Eyeglass Beauty Look – The New Geek Fall Fashion!

If you think those big plastic eye glasses are cool but not sure how to pull it off, here’s some inspiration for you.

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Get that manga look with that big brown turtle shell eyeglass + light brown curly hair with bangs + red lipstick! Pair it with a long orange open cardigan, a white tee and a pair of jean to match those glasses.

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Or tie up your hair in a super high ponytail for a more ‘student’ look!

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Bright red eyeglass frame can look so hot! If you want to create this WOW look, the key is to wear something that has the same bright red color to match the glasses and coordinate the color aesthetically. In this case, wearing a cardigan with red lining or just wearing a bright red cardigan will be great too, and not forgetting the bright red lipstick!

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

For a more fun look with color pop, pair it with a navy blue cardigan or jacket and carry a bright color bag like the yellow one in the picture.

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Another fun way of adding colors to your outfit is to play around with the color of your leggings and match it with a pair of bright contrasting color shoes. Remember to keep your top and bottom in neutral or darker color (and keep to the same color shade), otherwise you’ll turn into a clown instead. Pair this with a turtle shell or black eyeglass and you are good to go.

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

If bright yellow leggings are too much for you, you can opt for bright yellow shoes and pair it with green cardigan and a pair of jeans. Wearing green or lemon yellow eyeglasses will look really cool here.

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Korean Fashion Clothes For Women

Casual street wear look with a fun stripey cardigan, a rugged looking pair of torn jeans and a cool pair of sneakers!

(Source: Xiumei.com)

Korean Fashion Craze | Korean Culture News

Korean fashion craze had come a long way since Winter Sonata. Like a Tsunami, the whole of Asia was swept away by the Korean wave. Korean culture can be seen mushrooming all across major Asian cities (or maybe US too, Rain had a sold out concert at Madison Square!). Below is an article from a Singapore newspaper about the popularity of Korean Fashion.

Now if you, like many people, can’t tell what is the difference between Korean fashion, Japanese fashion and Hong Kong fashion, you gonna read the article below. Remember, authentic Korean fashion represents quality, so cheap stuff doesn’t mean it’s good stuff and price can never comprise quality. Do ask yourself if you want to get the real stuff or the ‘copied’ stuff next time when you are buying what is deemed as ‘Korean fashion’.

Korean Kraze – After K-pop and K-drama comes K-fashion. A handful of boutiques selling Korean fashion have opened shop.

(Reported In Singapore Newspaper: The Straits Times ‘Urban Magazine’ – 18 Jan 2007)

Angeline Lee’s Lilica shoe boutique may be hidden away on the fourth storey of The Cathay, but skilled shopaholics will know how to sniff it out.

A chandelier swings from the low ceiling while a large plasma TV plays the music videos of South Korean popster Rain. A Victorian-style chaise longue is the centrepiece of the store.

And, oh, don’t forget the shelves of shoes, which cost about SGD100 each.

‘The inspiration for the shop was The Princess Hours,’ says Lee, 24. The hit K-drama plays out in a palace, which boasts decadent interior trimmings not unlike those in her shop.

‘I try to watch every single Korean drama,’ she gushes. ‘I also make it a point to go to the KBS (a Korean TV station) website every day.’

So when Lee, a former travel contract manager, came across Korean shoe brand Lilica – which specialises in handmade shoes – in Seoul early last year, she seized the opportunity to set up a franchise here.

Say ‘annyonghaseyo’ to the Korean pop culture invasion of Singapore. First there were barbecue restaurants and weepy dramas, then a sprinkling of make-up brands appeared. Now, Korean fashion is here.

Notable shops include Myth and Green Petals at Far East Plaza, which sell an assortment of Korean streetwear; Sugar House at Far East Plaza and VivoCity, which stocks up on lovely, empire-line dresses; and Sentiments at Millenia Walk, which even sells the hanbok, Korea’s national dress.

This month, Korean- wannabes can go ga-ga at Square 2, a new 200,000 sq ft mall in Novena that will feature one floor of Korean products.

Out of 20 Korean-themed tenants, 20 to 25 per cent will be fashion boutiques, says Chia Boon Pin, chief operating officer of retail business at Far East Organisation, which runs the premises. Most of the smaller shops are hole-in-the-wall and run by enterprising Singaporeans who, like Lee, were inspired by the ever-growing Korean wave.

Former air stewardess Fiona Tan, 27, shopped so much in Seoul that she discovered her ‘flair for fashion’. She set up Myth two years ago, which imports 60 per cent of its wares from Korea.

To ensure they are getting their pick of the trendiest items, boutique owners make regular buying trips to Korea. So, rather than the mass-produced clothing you get at say, Topshop, you get one-off pieces that you probably wouldn’t find on anyone else.

Adelene Tan, 29, who owns Green Petals, started bringing in Korean fashion in late 2005. She scours the wholesale malls in Dongdaemum in Seoul for pieces to sell here.

Over at Sugarhouse, owner Alvin Ng, 30, works exclusively with factories in Seoul to create his own designs.

But really, what’s the big deal about Korean clothes? And how different are they from, say, Hong Kong fashion?

It’s about the quality, insist retailers.

Says Sentiments’ marketing manager Karen Wong: ‘One thing that sets Korean fashion apart from other Asian fashion is the meticulous detail in the workmanship of textiles as well as the production of its ready- made garments.’

So while Korean designs may be copied by Chinese or Hong Kong manufacturers, ‘feel the material and you should know what you’re paying for’, says Ng.

This is why clothes from Korea are about 10 to 20 per cent more expensive than those made in China or Hong Kong, he adds.

They may also be pricier than Japanese fashion, given the mass appeal of the latter.

Style-wise, Korean fashion is widely seen as more wearable than Japanese fashion, claims Myth’s Tan. Rather than outrageous Harajuku styles, you get clean lines that are more suited to Singaporean tastes.